Collections

Domestic objects

Food | Lighting | Housekeeping objects | Heating

Food

Wood | Metal | Ceramics | Glass

The Canadian kitchen was particularly well-equipped with a wide variety of utensils. Pewter utensils were less expensive and more common. The buffet and the pantry would be filled with spoons, plates, bowls, goblets, salt shakers, cups, and various platters, all made of pewter. Tin utensils were fairly common in country kitchens: dripping pans, blood pudding funnels, funnels, pie plates, cheese plates, skimmers, milk strainers, cruets, goblets and pepper boxes.

Wood

Wood was the material which our Quebec ancestors used the most. All the types of wood found in our forests (pine, spruce, maple, yellow birch, walnut) were used to make a large variety of kitchen items. These items were hollowed out, lathed and sculpted in the tree trunk, or made of small planks of wood assembled with dovetail joints that were held together by pins or nails.

Since wood was easy to work, the skilled craftsman could easily make thousands of useful and decorative items. Cooks in kitchens used wooden table articles such as sugar mills, butter churns, salt boxes, bread boxes, bowls, spoons and candlesticks.

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Butter churn

Butter churn
1994.1069.1-4

Bread box

Bread box
1994.389

Salt box

Salt box
1994.433.1-2

Spoon

Spoon
1994.394

Butter spoon

Butter spoon
1994.1005

Butter stamp

Butter stamp
1994.999

Pail

Pail
1994.395

Dipper

Dipper
1994.382

Sugar mold

Sugar mold
1997.69

Pestle

Pestle
1994.413.3

Pepper shaker

Pepper shaker
After 1825
1994.218.1-2

Metal

Although metal was not a precious material, it was still an essential one in a society of pioneers and settlers. As soon as they arrived in North America, the settlers understood this and opened up shops to deal with the demand. Metal workers would use moulds to make a very large variety of common objects. Pots of all kinds, kettles, irons, and doors for bread ovens were no doubt among the most common. The craftsman used large pots of various sizes. Large iron pots with tripods and handles, with or without rims, much like those that the Amerindians made from terracotta, were used for operations such as making soap or maple syrup, dying wool or preparing fabric.

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Plate

Plate
1994.489.4

Corker

Corker
1994.2142

Kettle

Kettle
1994.447

Caldron

Caldron
2000.11.1-2

Butter cutter

Butter cutter
1994.2166.1-3

Dinner bowl

Dinner bowl
1994.492.2

Perforated container

Perforated container
1994.3908

Fork

Fork
Early 20th century
1994.2538

Pickle fork

Pickle fork
Late 19th century
1994.2549.1

Fork

Fork
1994.2585.1

Vegetable chopper

Vegetable chopper
1994.899

Candy mold

Candy mold
1994.3248.1-2

Pitcher

Pitcher
1996.42.1

Crimper

Crimper
1994.3605

Measuring cup

Measuring cup
1994.2130

Ceramics

The French shared a need for survival with the Amerindians, who had to meet all of their own needs, as soon as they arrived in New France. The colonists, who had to produce everything they needed, took up a variety of crafts and, as a result, making ceramics became a necessary activity. Terrines, plates, jugs and pots appeared in kitchens in the 17th and 18th centuries.

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Butter churn

Butter churn
18th century
1994.434.1-3

Bowl with spout

Bowl with spout
1994.415.2

Jug

Jug
1994.2194

Perforated container

Perforated container
1994.2016

Jar

Jar
1994.425.1-2

Mortar

Mortar
1994.304.1-2

Salt tub

Salt tub
1994.3208.1-2

Sauceboat

Sauceboat
1994.865.16

Soup tureen

Soup tureen
1994.507.9.1-3

Glass

It appears that, in the time of New France, the pioneers called on their mother country (France) to satisfy their need for glass items, although this material was not in much use in the 18th and 19th centuries. Our ancestors imported glass windows, but table items and decorative objects were made of terracotta that was produced locally or provided by traveling pewter makers and, exceptionally, by the tinsmith. Glass was not made in Quebec until the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th.

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Serving platter

Serving platter
1994.1737.1-2

Cooking thermometer

Cooking thermometer
1994.2147.1-3

Glass stemware

Glass stemware
Late 17th century
1994.91.1

Glass stemware

Glass stemware
Late 17th century
1994.91.2

Glass on foot

Glass on foot
Late 17th century
1994.92